Welcome. Let’s Ride!

Life is better when experienced from a bicycle. Especially in the Adirondacks.

At its core Cycle Adirondacks is designed to connect you with the landscape, the communities and the people of this special place. Every rolling hill, every turn and every town has a story. And from the moment you arrive in Schroon Lake to the last mile, our goal is for you to experience those stories in a way that creates memories that last well beyond the photos you’ll capture.

Sure, the Adirondacks are the largest protected area in the lower 48 states – bigger than Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Yosemite and Glacier National Parks combined. Yet, our small historic towns, hidden lakes and streams that fill the valleys between the magnificent peaks make this corner of America feel like home. Comfortable. Relaxing.

It’s called the Adirondack Life. And it’s your life on Cycle Adirondacks.

Every dinner is farm-to-table and while the food is cooked and prepared by a world-class Upstate New York hospitality company, it may just be the local Rotary Club serving at the buffet line. The Middle School soccer team or a Scout with a wheelbarrow might carry your bags. It’s possible the editor of the daily newspaper is also the gentleman who’s playing guitar in the beer garden.

You’re registration fees are directly supporting community generated projects in each of our host communities and we’ll tell you more about this incredible initiatives later in this guide.

Cycle Adirondacks is about community. And we’re about making you a part of our community.

Thanks for riding with us. We’re so glad you’re here.

Cheers,

Doug Haney, Co-Director
Mobile: 518.524.4674
doug@cycleadirondacks.com

Matt VanSlyke, Co-Director
Mobile: 315.525.9554
matt@cycleadirondacks.com

 


Table of Contents

Click or tap each heading to be transferred directly to that section of the Ride Guide. The Guide may also be downloaded as a PDF by clicking HERE.

About Us

A Message from WCS
Event Volunteers
Event Hosts
Community Volunteers
Community Grants

Camp Basics

Site Maps
Daily Event Schedule
Sleeping Arrangements
Hotel/Town Shuttles
Meals
Complete Menu
Showers
Towels
Handwashing
Toilets
Laundry
Water
Sustainability
Help Desk
Community Booth
Mechanics
Bike Storage
Baggage
Gear Drop
Cell Coverage
Device Charging
Wi-Fi Access
First Aid

Arriving and Departing

Getting Ready
Packing List
Getting There
Event Check-in

On the Route

Course Hours
Daily Route Descriptions and Maps
Ride Rules
Signage/Hazards
Course Monitors
SAGs
Emergency/Medical
Communications/Text Alerts
Rider Safety
Lunch, Rest and Water Stops
Wildlife Conservation Society Wildlife Guides/Book
Start/Finish Areas
Mechanics

Fun Stuff

Entertainment
Beer Garden
Specialty Food Vendors
Off Bike Activities
Wildlife Conservation Society Science Program
Event Retail
Social Media
Wellness Services
Camp Games


About Us

A Message from Wildlife Conservation Society

A Message from Wildlife Conservation Society​

Cycle Adirondacks was conceived by the Wildlife Conservation Society ​three years ago ​based on ​the idea that a week-long bicycle tour ​is a low impact way to promote a special place, ​like the Adirondacks, ​and it allows riders and volunteers to ​experience first hand the conservation work being done to protect and preserve an environmental treasure.

Cycle Adirondacks gives guests the opportunity to discover the Adirondack Park; ​it inspires​ people to visit and appreciate the region, and lead​s​ to new opportunities for nature- and adventure-based tourism that will ultimately lead to a stronger, more vibrant region.

​There is something wonderful about being completely immersed ​in the Adirondacks and our WCS Science Crew will ​help do just that. Our crew of WCS staff and world-class scientist volunteers ​are on hand all week to help ​you understand​ the region and the wildlife that live here. We ​created the Cycle Adirondacks ​Riders’ ​Field Guide ​with a history of the Park, descriptions of wildlife and wild places, and maps containing some Points of Interest each day. ​Our Science Crew is on the route and in camp each day to answer your burning questions about the natural world. We will also offer afternoon talks about current environmental issues. Finally, we will be your guide on some special WCS-led off-bike activities.

WCS has been working in the Adirondack region ​for more than 20 years. We pride ourselves on delivering science-based expertise to help inform important conservation decisions. Our Adirondack staff of scientists is small but effective, and we are proud to be part of an international organization aiming to save wildlife and wild places around the world. WCS is based at the Bronx Zoo and operates the other major zoos ​​in the metro NY area as well as the NY Aquarium. Locally, we apply a community-based approach to conservation, recognizing that conservation can’t be effective without the participation of local residents and leaders. ​We are proud to support this ​event ​because it provides an economic boost to our partner towns and helps showcase this spectacular landscape.

Whether this is your first time in the Adirondacks or not, we welcome you to enjoy Cycle Adirondacks and look forward to being part of your ride!

Zoë 

Zoë Smith, WCS Adirondacks Program Director
Mobile: 518.418.9412
zsmith@wcs.org

Event Volunteers (a.k.a. Roadies)

An event like this relies on its volunteers to a degree you may not even be able to imagine. It takes an incredible amount work each day to support riders, move camp, make sure everything runs… it’s mind-blowing.

We’re lucky to have a large group of selfless volunteers who are giving a week of their time to make your life better – and they’re doing it because they believe in bicycle tourism, because they like to serve, because they welcome the opportunity to spend a week in this beautiful landscape… there are any number of reasons. But the bottom line is this: They’re giving, and we’re getting.

So make sure to let them know how much you appreciate their efforts!

Hosts

Cycle Adirondacks is known for its amazing host communities and this summer’s ride is no different. Our goal is to provide you with a true connection to the towns and villages we spend time in and strive to involve the residents of these special places. After all, we are their guests.

That means we need to be good guests. Besides being polite and respectful (of people and laws), we encourage you to take the time to meet people in each town. We’re bringing in riders from more than 30 states and provinces, so this is a great opportunity to learn more about people from different places – and our host communities are excited to meet you.

Community Volunteers

Each host community for Cycle ADK 2017 provides a hardy group of local volunteers to help us with our traveling circus. These folks will be helping with food, setting tables, preparing finish-line celebrations, helping set up your camp, carrying your bags… without their help we couldn’t pull off this event.

Cycle Adirondacks is about cycling, but it’s also about connecting our riders with communities and the wonderful people who call them home. One powerful vehicle for that connection is our partnership with Adirondack Foundation, Glenn and Carol Pearsall Foundation and the Wildlife Conservation Society. Through this collaboration, we seed and raise funds for community generated projects in each of our overnight host towns. By riding with us, you help make these projects happen.

2017 COMMUNITY GRANT PROJECTS
SCHROON LAKE

This Farm-to-Table project is an initiative of Schroon Lake Central School – our Cycle ADK camp for 2017. This new school agricultural program will help students understand where their food comes from and how they can use the Earth to become self-sufficient and responsible consumers. The centerpiece will be the construction of a chicken coop that will be used as a study lab for raising and understanding livestock. Other facets include the construction of raised garden beds and the implementation of a composting system. Each will help instill and teach a lifelong passion for gardening, farming and responsible use of the land.

KEENE VALLEY

As you’ll see, Keene Valley is a lush environment for wildlife, including the iconic “Wild Child of the Adirondacks” — our native beavers. Beavers are habitat engineers, building dams and ponds that make our mountain home so biodiverse and beautiful — but this work can also get them into trouble! To help protect New York State’s official mammal, we are helping the town of Keene Valley install a “beaver-deceiver” water control structure to prevent flooding and keep this wild child out of trouble while they do their beaver thing, enhancing native habitat. 

SARANAC LAKE

The Capital of the Adirondacks is all about bikes, which is why they’ve hosted Cycle Adirondacks for three consecutive years. This project will help the Saranac Lake Youth Center establish a fund to purchase bikes for Saranac Lake area youth in grades 6-12. The main priority is to get bikes to youth who need them for transportation to a job, recreational purposes, and exercise. In addition to providing bikes, the youth will be taught bike safety and be given helmets and bike locks. Ride on Saranac Lake!

You can contribute additionally to each of these projects at cycleadirondacks.com/cycleadk-gives.

Return to Table of Contents


Arriving and Departing

Getting Ready

Body and Bike
These are the two main considerations involved: your body and your bike. And trust us, you want both to be in top shape when you start the tour.

Getting your body ready is a matter of putting in the time on the bike so that you’re ready for multiple, consecutive days in the saddle. Make no mistake about it: Unless you’re superhuman, you can’t show up and ride yourself into shape. Our best advice is to make sure you have the hours in, whether they’re fast or slow, flat or climb. It’s a tour, not a race, so speed is not the key element – riding the day’s route is. The most important thing is that you’re used to being in the saddle for hours at a time, multiple days in a row.

The route is not all hills, even though the Adirondacks are a mountain range, we’re not attacking any long alpine climbs. There’s less than 22,000 feet of climbing even if you do every option and every mile; that’s an average of about 3,000 feet a day. So it’s not Tour de France passes – but you need to have put in some seat time in order to get back on the bike day after day and have a fun experience.

If you’re trying frantically to get ready in this last month, the best advice is to just go out and ride as much as possible. If you have a good base of days and miles, you’ll be fine.

And what about your bike? Well, we have a team of mechanics along on the ride – but that doesn’t mean they’re here to get your bike ready to ride. You’re expected to bring a bike that’s tuned up and in riding shape. If it needs a tweak or two, no problem – our mechanics are here to help you out. But you should arrange to have your bike tuned up with your local bike shop before you head out to the Adirondacks – or if you’re handy with the two-wheeled machines, spend some quality time with your steed before you arrive in Schroon Lake. If you’re shipping your bike, the experienced staff of Placid Planet Bicycles will reassemble and deliver your bike to the start. But please don’t use this re-assembly as an invitation for a free tune-up.

Packing List

Everyone has a different approach to packing, but there are some baseline needs that you should take into account. The list below is not intended to be a final list – just a start that you can customize to your situation and needs.

Veterans of events like this have devised various systems that work well for them – one of the more prevalent ones is to use a series of zip-lock bags for daily riding gear and also for storing dirty/smelly clothes during the week.

And don’t forget that you’re limited to 65 pounds per rider, in one (or two, if you absolutely must) bags. There are multiple reasons for this, including vendors’ and community volunteers’ backs, gas mileage on baggage trucks, etc. – but the bottom line is this: It’s the rule, and it applies to you. Don’t be that person who thinks, “Well, it’s OK if I just…”

Weather – please remember that upstate New York is one more of those places where people say “If you don’t like the weather, wait five minutes.” While temperatures tend to be pleasant in late August (that’s why we picked the dates), we could get anything from cold rain to scorching heat. So pack for everything, and remember that cotton gets cold when wet. Evening temperatures will likely dip into the upper 40s or lower 50s. You’ll enjoy the evening entertainment much more with a light jacket.

On the Bike

  • Helmet
  • Two bike-specific water bottles
  • Basic tool/repair kit
  • Shoes
  • Sunglasses
  • Jerseys (at least one long-sleeve)
  • Shorts or bibs
  • Base layer (at least 2)
  • Tights
  • Arm/leg warmers
  • Light jacket or vest
  • Rain gear
  • Socks
  • Gloves (regular plus full-finger)
  • Booties/toe covers
  • Skullcap or other headwear
  • Chamois butter
  • Headlight and taillight (we don’t ride at night but lights help at all times)

Off the Bike

  • Shorts
  • Long Pants
  • Swimsuit
  • Shirts (short- and long-sleeve)
  • Warm jacket – thin insulated jacket might be necessary in the evenings
  • Socks and underwear
  • Walk-around shoes
  • Hat and gloves (early mornings and evenings can be cool)
  • Towel and washcloth
  • Soap and shampoo (eco-friendly if possible)
  • Skin lotion and sunscreen
  • Lip balm
  • Personal hygiene items
  • Bug repellant, wet wipes, band-aids, athletic tape
  • Laundry bag
  • Camera
  • Ear plugs
  • Book, cards, journal
  • Charger for electronic devices (free charging stations available in camp)

Camping

  • Tent (with rain fly)
  • Ground cloth
  • Sleeping pad and bag
  • Pillow
  • Head lamp or flashlight
  • Camp chair (if it fits in your bag and within the weight limit. You can also rent them a la carte from Comfy Campers)
Getting There

Flying In
Airport Shuttles
If you’re flying in to Albany International Airport, we’ll run a shuttle on the afternoon of Saturday 8/19 to take you and your bike/bag(s) to our camp in Schroon Lake. A Pre-Event Rider Questionnaire will be sent one week before the event requesting your flight day/time in order to help us plan our shuttle schedule. We will be in contact with everyone flying in to Albany regarding shuttle times.

Bike Shipping
If you want to ship your bike to the event, we partner Bike Flights. They’ll help you with all the steps and make sure your precious cargo gets to the event.

If your bike is shipped for the event (via our partners or on your own) and is to be assembled in time for the ride, the address is Placid Planet Bicycles, 2242 Saranac Ave., Lake Placid NY 12946 (phone: 518.523.4128). The folks at Placid Planet will get your bike to camp in Schroon Lake.

NOTE: If you are shipping a bike on your own, you must contact Placid Planet in advance to arrange the details. And if you ship your bike to Placid Planet, they will assume you want it assembled and will charge you $50; if you do not want them to assemble it, please indicate that prominently on the bike box or contact them directly in advance. Then you will be responsible for assembly on your own

Bike Assembly/Disassembly
If you’re bringing your bike to the event disassembled in a box for any reason, you can have our mechanics team help you assemble it – we’ll keep your box during the week, and the mechanics can help you disassemble it at the end of the tour to go back in the box. Make sure to pre-arrange assembly and disassembly with our bike-shop partner, Placid Planet (phone: 518.523.4128).

Fees for assembly and disassembly are paid directly to the mechanic: $50 for assembly; $75 for disassembly.

Driving In
If you’re driving to the event, here’s how it works:

Drive to our campsite at Schroon Lake Central School (directions below) and park in Temporary Parking in the paved lot (follow the signs) while you pick up your registration packet.

Unload your bike and put it on the bike racks; the Baggage Team can help you unload your bags and take them to your campsite or the hotel shuttle stop.

Then all riders will drive their vehicles to Long-Term Parking located just .2 miles from camp in the grassy field behind the Tops Market parking lot. 

Key Service
The Schroon Lake Boy Scouts will help you park your car and offer a key service. Simply give your keys to the key-service attendant, who will be on hand from from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 19. The Boy Scouts will take your keys and secure them for the week, and will be there Friday, Aug. 25, until all the keys are returned. The suggested donation for this service is $20.

Directions to Camp in Schroon Lake:
Schroon Lake Central School
1125 U.S. 9, Schroon Lake, NY 12870
Google Map: https://goo.gl/maps/ANUJfCjNqvL2

Arrival from the North
From I-87 coming from the north: Take Exit 28 for Route 9. Turn left onto NY-74 toward Ticonderoga Ferry/Schroon Lake/Fort Ticonderoga. Cross under I-87 and make an immediate right onto Route 9 South. Our camp is Schroon Lake Central School will be on your right in 2.3 miles.

Arrival from the South
From I-87 coming from the south: Take Exit 27 toward Route 9/Schroon Lake. Head North toward Mountain Side Rd and be sure to stop at Paradox Brewery located just .2 miles from exit 27. The Paradox Brewery Summer Concert Series will be in full swing from 2-6 p.m. After your passengers sample their delicious beer (and buy you a six-pack), continue North on Route 9 and drive through downtown Schroon Lake. Our camp at Schroon Lake Central School will be on your left, 4.6 miles after Paradox Brewery.

Event Check-In

Packet Pickup Hours:
Saturday, 8/19: 3-8 p.m.
Sunday, 8/20: 6-8 a.m.

You can pick up your Rider Packet at the Registration Tents in the area next to where Temporary Parking is located at Schroon Lake Central School. When you check in, you’ll get your rider wristband, luggage tags, a number sticker for your bike, cue sheets, sponsor information, your rider T-shirt and a goodie bag. If you’ve pre-ordered a jersey or other apparel, you’ll get them here as well. If you haven’t signed our ride waiver online, you’ll need to do that at check-in.

NOTE: In an effort to cut down on paper waste, we won’t be printing a large supply of extra cue sheets. Please treat them well and keep track of them. We recommend bringing just the current day’s sheet on the route and keeping the rest back in camp with your luggage. You can also download a set of individual daily route maps from the website – the final routes will be available one week prior to the event. We recommend waiting to download all the routes until then to ensure you have the latest versions.

Once you put on your wristband, you should not take it off for any reason – it’s how we know you’re officially part of the ride. Without it you’re not allowed to use our event facilities or resources, including meals and medical treatment.

Our Cycle Adirondacks Help Desk will be located in the row of tents just behind event registration, if you need any additional information.

Comfy Campers
If you’ve signed up for Comfy Campers tent service, there will be a separate check-in spot at their designated camping area in the field at the park, where will you get your assignment and be shown to your tent.

Return to Table of Contents


Camp Basics

Site Maps

Each camp during the week is laid out with the same basic elements, but each site is geographically unique, so things vary. To help out, we’ve created Site Maps that cover all our overnight sites. They show you where our mechanics will be set up, where massage will be, the location of our showers, etc. Copies will be available at our Help Desk.

2017 Daily Event Schedule 

Saturday, Aug. 19 – Arrival Day in Schroon Lake
3-8 p.m.                                   Onsite Registration Open
3-9 p.m.                                   Showers Open
                                                  Beer Garden Open
                                                  Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
5:30-8 p.m.                              Dinner Service in Camp
6:30 p.m.                                 Event Announcements at Dinner Service
7-9 p.m.                                   Entertainment at Beer Garden
9:00 p.m.                                 Final Community/Hotel Shuttle Departs Camp and Beer Garden

Sunday, Aug. 20 – Schroon Lake Out-and-Back Routes
5:30-8:30 a.m.                       Showers Open
6:30-7 a.m.                            Free Yoga in Camp
6-8 a.m.                                  Breakfast Open
                                                Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
6 a.m.-10 p.m.                       Pre-Booked Wellness Services Available in Camp
7-9 a.m.                                  Route Start Window
10 a.m.-2 p.m.                       Lunch Open in Camp
11a.m.-4 p.m.                        Showers Open
2 p.m.                                     Scheduled Off-Bike Activities Depart Camp
3-4 p.m.                                  Free Chair Massage at Wellness Center in Camp
4-5 p.m.                                  Free Yoga in Camp
4:30 p.m.                                WCS Wildlife Talk in Camp
5:30 p.m.                                Conservation Canines Demonstration in Camp
5:30-8 p.m.                             Dinner Service in Camp
6-9 p.m.                                   Showers Open
6:30 p.m.                                 Event Announcements at Dinner Service
7-9 p.m.                                   Entertainment at Beer Garden
9:00 p.m.                                 Final Community/Hotel Shuttle Departs Camp and Beer Garden

Monday, Aug. 21 – Schroon Lake to Keene Valley
5:30-8:30 a.m.                         Showers Open
6-8 a.m.                                    Breakfast Open
                                                  Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
6:30-7 a.m.                               Free Yoga in Camp
7-9 a.m.                                    Route Start Window
10 a.m.-2 p.m.                         Lunch Open on Route
1-9 p.m.                                    Showers Open
                                                  Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
1:20 p.m.                                 SOLAR ECLIPSE BEGINS*
2:40 p.m.                                 MAX VIEWING OF SOLAR ECLIPSE 
4:00 p.m.                                 SOLAR ECLIPSE CONCLUDES

3-4 p.m.                                   Free Chair Massage at Wellness Center in Camp
4-5 p.m.                                   Free Yoga in Camp
4-10 p.m.                                 Pre-Booked Wellness Services Available in Camp
4:30 p.m.                                 WCS Wildlife Talk in Camp
5:30-8 p.m.                             Dinner Service in Camp
6:30 p.m.                                 Event Announcements at Dinner Service
7-9 p.m.                                   Entertainment at Beer Garden
9:00 p.m.                                 Final Community/Hotel Shuttle Departs Camp and Beer Garden

*ISO Certified Solar Eclipse viewing glasses will be provided to all riders on the morning of Aug. 21.

Tuesday, Aug. 22 – Keene Valley Out-and-Back Routes
5:30-8:30 a.m.                        Showers Open
6-8 a.m.                                   Breakfast Open
                                                 Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
6 a.m.-10 p.m.                       Pre-Booked Wellness Services Available in Camp
6:30-7 a.m.                             Free Yoga in Camp
7-9 a.m.                                  Route Start Window
8:30 a.m.                                Whiteface Hill Climb Bus Departs Camp
10 a.m.-2 p.m.                       Lunch Open in Camp
11a.m.-4 p.m.                        Showers Open
2 p.m.                                     Scheduled Off-Bike Activities Depart Camp
3-4 p.m.                                  Free Chair Massage at Wellness Center in Camp
4-5 p.m.                                  Free Yoga in Camp
4:30 p.m.                                WCS Wildlife Talk in Camp
5:30-8 p.m.                            Dinner Service in Camp
6-9 p.m.                                  Showers Open
6:30 p.m.                                Event Announcements at Dinner Service
7-9 p.m.                                  Entertainment at Beer Garden
9:00 p.m.                                Final Community/Hotel Shuttle Departs Camp and Beer Garden

Wednesday, Aug. 23 – Keene Valley to Saranac Lake

5:30-8:30 a.m.                       Showers Open
6-8 a.m.                                  Breakfast Open
                                                Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
6:30-7 a.m.                            Free Yoga in Camp
7-9 a.m.                                  Route Start Window
10 a.m.-2 p.m.                       Lunch Open on Route
1-9 p.m.                                  Showers Open
                                                 Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
3-4 p.m.                                  Free Chair Massage at Wellness Center in Camp
4-5 p.m.                                  Free Yoga in Camp
4-10 p.m.                                Pre-Booked Wellness Services Available in Camp
4:30 p.m.                                WCS Wildlife Talk in Camp
5:30-8 p.m.                            Dinner Service at Beer Garden
6:30 p.m.                                Event Announcements at Beer Garden
7-9 p.m.                                  Entertainment at Beer Garden
9:00 p.m.                                Final Community/Hotel Shuttle Departs Camp and Beer Garden

Thursday, Aug. 22 – Saranac Lake Out-and-Back Routes
5:30-8:30 a.m.                        Showers Open
6-8 a.m.                                   Breakfast Open
                                                 Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
6 a.m.-10 p.m.                        Pre-Booked Wellness Services Available in Camp
6:30-7 a.m.                              Free Yoga in Camp
8:30 a.m.                                 Wild Center Bus Tour Departs Camp
7-9 a.m.                                   Route Start Window
10 a.m.-2 p.m.                        Lunch Open in Camp
11a.m.-4 p.m.                         Showers Open
2 p.m.                                       Scheduled Off-Bike Activities Depart Camp
3-4 p.m.                                   Free Chair Massage at Wellness Center in Camp
4-5 p.m.                                   Free Yoga in Camp
4:30 p.m.                                 WCS Wildlife Talk in Camp
5:30-8 p.m.                             Dinner Service in Camp
6-9 p.m.                                   Showers Open
6:30 p.m.                                 Event Announcements at Dinner Service
5-7 p.m.                                   Entertainment at Beer Garden
7-9 p.m.                                   Party on the Patio at The Waterhole
9:00 p.m.                                 Final Community/Hotel Shuttle Departs Camp

Friday, Aug. 25 – Saranac Lake to Schroon Lake
5:30-7:30 a.m.                        Showers Open
5:30-7:30 a.m.                        Breakfast Open
                                                 Community/Hotel Shuttles Operating
6:30-7 a.m.                             Free Yoga in Camp
7-8 a.m.                                   Route Start Window
11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.                  Lunch Open at Route Finish in Schroon Lake
11:30-4 p.m.                          Showers Open
5:00 p.m.                                Event Services Conclude

Sleeping Arrangements

You have three basic choices for where to sleep during Cycle Adirondacks: camp at our sites in your tent, camp at our sites using the Comfy Campers tent service, or arrange for your own lodging in our host towns.

If you’re camping in your own tent, it’s pretty straightforward: When you reach the next camp, our Guest Camping area will be clearly marked. Find a spot, pitch your tent. You might want to consider proximity to toilets/handwashing stations, showers and dining in choosing a spot.

If you’re using Comfy Campers, your tent will be set up for you in the designated Tent Service area in the next camp by 3 p.m. You’ll have to pick up your bag, or have a local volunteer carry it from the Baggage Drop area in camp (tips are appreciated!).

If you’re using local lodging, you can make your own way there and back (check in advance with the lodging property about bike storage) or use our Hotel/Town Shuttle, which will make regular rounds from camp to designated lodging properties, running from 1-9 p.m. and then again from 6-8 a.m. in the morning. The shuttles can accommodate your baggage, but will not have bike racks, so we recommend you leave your bike in our bike corral in camp overnight.

Hotel/Town Shuttles

If you’re staying in lodging rather than tent-camping at our site, or if you just want to catch a ride into town or the entertainment venue, you can use our free Hotel/Town Shuttle system.

Our shuttle routes in each town are based on lodging properties we have identified to our riders, and your responses to our rider questionnaire, which will be sent one week before the ride. You can ask a driver to drop you off elsewhere along their route, but they will only pick up at the designated stops. This helps keep the shuttles running on time, so please don’t randomly flag them down.

Shuttle schedules for each town will be displayed on a whiteboard at the designated shuttle stop in each camp. Information on shuttle times and locations is also available at the Help Desk. Our Hotel/Town Shuttle vans will start running at 1 p.m.; the spot in camp where vans will pick up riders is indicated on each camp’s site map. They will run throughout the evening, with the last van leaving camp and the entertainment venue at 9:00 p.m.

Unless you ride it to your lodging, we recommend you leave your bike in camp overnight at our bike corral. You may also want to consider bringing a light backpack in your baggage, and use the backpack to take overnight necessities with you rather than your entire bag; you can leave the bag at the baggage drop area and our crew will put bags in the trucks overnight for safety.

In the morning, vans will stop regularly at all the lodging properties on the route, beginning at 6 a.m. and until 8 a.m. You should be out in front of the lodging property with your baggage, ready to go. We will deploy multiple vans, but you’ll have to have some flexibility and patience as they work to accommodate everyone.

Meals

Cycle Adirondacks offers three hearty, professionally catered meals a day, beginning with dinner Saturday, August 19 in Schroon Lake, and ending with lunch Friday, August 25 in Schroon Lake.

We pride ourselves in connecting you with the spectacular Adirondack environment in every sense and that includes the food. Our partners Mazzone Hospitality have created a fabulous menu and infused more locally sourced products than ever including farm-to-table dinners every night of the tour thanks to our friends at the FarmOn! Foundation. We can assure you that we will once again have amazing food with healthy choices for all diets.

Special Notes:

  • On out-and-back ride days, (Aug. 20, 22 and 24), lunch will be served in camp
  • On point-to-point ride days (Aug. 21 and 23), lunch will be served on the route.
  • Dinner on Aug. 23 will be a special meal with live entertainment at Riverside Park in Saranac Lake.
  • Breakfast on Aug. 25 will close 30 minutes earlier at 7:30 a.m.
  • On Aug. 25, the final lunch will be served at the finish line in Schroon Lake.
  • Guests participating in the Whiteface Memorial Highway Hill Climb on Aug. 22 and the Wild Center Bus Experience on Aug. 24 will be able to pick up their lunches the morning before departing. We’ll have a cooler for you in our vehicles in order to keep your lunch cold. 

Local Sourcing – Farm-to-Table Every Night!
Thanks to a cooperative effort between Cycle Adirondacks, Mazzone Hospitality and the FarmOn! Foundation, we’re proud to announce that every dinner will be a farm-to-table meal featuring fresh organic products from New York farms. We’re also thrilled to partner with Bitters & Bones in Saranac Lake for a special farm-to-table taco bar on August 23 in Riverside Park featuring live music by Alex Torres and His Latin Orchestra. 

Vegetarian, Gluten-Free and Other Diets
We have worked with our caterer, Mazzone Catering, to balance our menus to accommodate as many dietary preferences and needs as possible. Although it’s impossible to create a menu that addresses every need, you will find that menus at Cycle Adirondacks are diverse, healthy and provide ample energy for a day in the saddle. If you have special dietary circumstances, we’ll make every reasonable effort to accommodate you. Please contact us with any concerns.

Meal Procedures
We’ve set up our dining to be as efficient and safe as possible for our riders. In camp, simply show up at the dining area during meal hours. You must be wearing your wristband to go through the food line. All food service areas, including rest stops, are designated glove-free zones.

Handwashing stations will be positioned at the entrance to the dining area – stop and wash your hands for every meal. A group of cyclists with dirty hands going through the same food lines is a situation ripe for spreading germs; please be considerate of others and clean up well.

Lunch
At lunch stops along the route, we’ll have a similar setup, with a lighter meal served more buffet-style.

Note: Nutritious options will be available at all lunch stops for our gluten-conscious guests.

2017 Menu

Arrival Day; Saturday, August 19 – Dinner: Schroon Lake
Seared Salmon with Mediterranean Tomato Olive Relish Braised Short Rib with Red Wine Demi
Mashed Potatoes
Summer Corn and Vegetable Succotash
3 Grain Stuffed Peppers with Tomato Gravy
Green Bean Salad with Red Peppers, Artichoke Hearts, and Red Wine Vinaigrette
Seasonal Fruit Salad
Rolls & Butter (including gluten-free)
Summer Berry Cobbler & Gluten Free Sweets

Day 1; Sunday, August 20 – Breakfast: Schroon Lake
Roasted potatoes
Turkey Breakfast Sausage
Assorted Breakfast Burritos and Croissants (Bacon & Egg, Ham & Cheese, Spinach & Cheese)
Gluten Free Option, with protein – TBD
Oranges & Bananas
Fruit Salad
Yogurt
Cereal with Chilled Milks
Old-Fashioned Oatmeal with Nuts, Raisins and Brown Sugar

Dispensers of Cranberry & Orange Juice
Individual Cartons of Milk & Chocolate Milk
Coffee, Decaf & Tea Station – Cream, Sugar, Lemon & Honey

Rest Stop 1: Route;
Oranges & Bananas
Celery with Peanut Butter
Roasted Sunflower Seeds
Snack Size Candy Bars

Rest Stop 2: Route;
Oranges & Bananas
Grilled Herb Flatbread with Vegetable cream cheese
Hard Boiled Eggs
Snack Size Candy Bars

Dispensers Gatorade

Lunch: In Camp; Schroon Lake
Classic Garden Salad with Grilled Chicken (Mixed Greens, Tomatoes, Cucumber’s, Carrots, Shaved Red Onion, Croutons and Balsamic Vinaigrette)
Falafel with Tabbouleh Salad and Tzatziki sauce
Oranges & Bananas
Fried Vegetable Chips
Fudge Brownies
Assorted Soda: Dr. Brown’s Diet Black Cherry & Root Beer, ADK Seltzer Lemon Lime & Raspberry Lime

Dinner: Schroon Lake
Meatloaf with Mushroom Pan Gravy
Italian Roasted Chicken
Turmeric Roasted Cauliflower with Red Onion and Cilantro
Herb Roasted Red Bliss Potatoes
Seasonal Fruit Salad
Make Your Own Salad Bar
Rolls & Butter (including gluten-free)
Assorted Cakes & Tarts (including gluten-free)

Day 2; Monday, August 21 – Breakfast: Schroon Lake
Hash Browned Potatoes
Crispy Bacon Scrambled Eggs Oranges & Bananas Fruit Salad
Yogurt
Cereal with Chilled Milks
Old-Fashioned Oatmeal with Nuts, Raisins and Brown Sugar

Dispensers of Cranberry & Orange Juice
Individual Cartons of Milk & Chocolate Milk
Coffee, Decaf & Tea Station – Cream, Sugar, Lemon & Honey

Rest Stop:
Oranges & Bananas Hummus with Pita Chips Pretzels
Snack Size Candy bar

Dispensers of Gatorade

Lunch: Route;
Chicken Caesar Wraps
Grilled Eggplant, Roasted Tomato, Fresh Mozzarella and Pesto Wraps
Oranges & Bananas Tortilla Chips with Salsa Bakery-Fresh Cookies
Assorted Soda: Dr. Brown’s Diet Black Cherry & Root Beer, ADK Seltzer Lemon Lime & Raspberry Lime

Dinner: Keene Valley
Sausage and Peppers with Hoagie Rolls
Eggplant and Spinach Cannelloni with Summer Tomato Ragu Shrimp Scampi with Spinach and Tomatoes, and Parmesan Grits Basil, Cucumber, and Red Onion Salad
Summer Squash Ratatouille
Seasonal Fruit Salad
Bread & Butter (including gluten-free) Seasonal Fruit Crisp & Gluten Free Sweets

Day 3; Tuesday, August 22 – Breakfast: Keene Valley
Petite Breakfast Hash Brown Patties
Chicken Apple Sausage
Breakfast Frittatas (Onions, Peppers, and Ham & Potatoes, Onions, Peppers & Spinach) garnished with cheese
Gluten Free Option, with protein – TBD
Oranges & Bananas
Fruit Salad
Yogurt
Cereal with Chilled Milks
Old-Fashioned Oatmeal with Nuts, Raisins and Brown Sugar

Dispensers of Cranberry & Orange Juice
Individual Cartons of Milk & Chocolate Milk
Coffee, Decaf & Tea Station – Cream, Sugar, Lemon & Honey

Rest Stop 1: Route;
Oranges & Bananas
Mini PB&J Sandwiches
String Cheese
Snack Size Candy Bar

Rest Stop 2: Route;
Oranges & Bananas Roasted Peanuts
Mini Egg Salad Sandwiches
Snack Size Candy bar

Dispensers of Gatorade

Lunch: In Camp; Keene Valley
Greek Salad with Grilled Chicken (Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Kalamata Olives, Shaved Red Onion, Feta Cheese, Sliced Grilled
Chicken, and Red Wine Vinaigrette) Greek Salad with Seasoned Tofu Oranges & Bananas
Pretzels
Fruit Bars
Assorted Soda: Dr. Brown’s Diet Black Cherry & Root Beer, ADK Seltzer Lemon Lime & Raspberry Lime

Dinner: Keene Valley
General Tso Chicken Beef and Broccoli
Vegetable Fried Rice with Tofu
Vegetable Pad Thai Salad with Asian Vinaigrette
Seasonal Fruit Salad
Make Your Own Salad Bar
Rolls & Butter (including gluten-free) Assorted Cakes & Tarts

Day 4; Wednesday, August 23 – Breakfast: Keene Valley
Jack Cheese Grits Turkey Bacon Broccoli Quiche
Gluten Free Option, with protein – TBD
Oranges & Bananas
Fruit Salad
Yogurt
Cereal with Chilled Milks
Old-Fashioned Oatmeal with Nuts, Raisins and Brown Sugar

Dispensers of Cranberry & Orange Juice
Individual Cartons of Milk & Chocolate Milk
Coffee, Decaf & Tea Station – Cream, Sugar, Lemon & Honey

Rest Stop:
Oranges & Bananas
Banana Nut Bread with Nutella Spread
Cottage Cheese with Grape Clusters
Snack Size Candy Bar

Dispensers of Gatorade

Lunch: Route
Roast Turkey Wraps (Lettuce, Sliced Tomatoes, and Cranberry Mayonnaise)
Roasted Vegetable Wraps (Artichoke’s, Roasted Red Pepper, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Red Onion, Eggplant and Hummus)
Whole Fruits & Bananas
Potato Chips
Fruit Bars
Assorted Soda: Dr. Brown’s Diet Black Cherry & Root Beer, ADK Seltzer Lemon Lime & Raspberry Lime

Dinner: Saranac Lake – Riverside Park
Bitters & Bones Farm-to-Table Taco Bar 
Summer Salad: Fresh Greens, Spring Veggies, Chimichurri Vinaigrette 
Sofrito Rice
Roasted Vegetable Medley 
Smoked Kate Mountain Chicken
Smoked Kate Mountain Pork
Salsa Verde
Corn Tortillas

Day 5; Thursday, August 24 – Breakfast: Saranac Lake
Waffles with Syrup and Fresh Berries
Scrambled Eggs
New Potato Home Fries
Breakfast Sausage Oranges & Bananas Fruit Salad
Yogurt
Cereal with Chilled Milks
Old-Fashioned Oatmeal with Nuts, Raisins and Brown Sugar

Dispensers of Cranberry & Orange Juice
Individual Cartons of Milk & Chocolate Milk
Coffee, Decaf & Tea Station – Cream, Sugar, Lemon & Honey

Rest Stop 1 & 2: Route; Tupper Lake & Lake Placid (different locations, same offerings)
Oranges & Bananas
Celery with Peanut Butter Roasted Sunflower Seeds Snack Size Candy Bars Dispensers of GatoradeLunch: In Camp; Saranac Lake
Roast Beef & Cheddar with Horseradish Aioli on Sliced Bread
Portabella Mushroom Sandwich with Red Peppers, Feta and Balsamic on Sliced Bread
Potato Chips Oranges & Bananas Fudge Brownies

Assorted Soda: Dr. Brown’s Diet Black Cherry & Root Beer, ADK Seltzer Lemon Lime & Raspberry Lime

Dinner: Saranac Lake
Herb Roasted Pork Loin with Country stuffing and Cider Jus
Blackened Catfish with Etouffee Sauce Summer Vegetable Medley Sauté Roasted Tri Color Fingerling Potatoes Sautéed Romano Beans with Herb Butter
Watermelon and Blueberry Salad with Local Feta
Seasonal Fruit Salad
Bread & Butter (including gluten-free) Seasonal Fruit Cobbler & Gluten Free Sweets

Day 6; Friday, August 25 – Breakfast: Saranac Lake
Skillet Browned Potatoes with Peppers and Onions
Crispy Bacon
Assorted Breakfast Sandwiches’ (Bacon, Egg & Cheese / Ham, Egg & Cheese / Spinach, Egg & Cheese)
Gluten Free Option, with protein – TBD
Oranges & Bananas
Fruit Salad
Yogurt
Cereal with Chilled Milks
Old-Fashioned Oatmeal with Nuts, Raisins and Brown Sugar

Dispensers of Cranberry & Orange Juice
Individual Cartons of Milk & Chocolate Milk
Coffee, Decaf & Tea Station – Cream, Sugar, Lemon & Honey

Rest Stop 1: Route;
Oranges & Bananas
Mini PB&J Sandwiches
Hard Boiled Eggs
Snack Size Candy Bar

Rest Stop 2: Route;
Oranges & Bananas
Hummus with Pita Chips
Pretzels
Snack Size Candy Bar

Dispensers of Gatorade

Finish Line Lunch: Schroon Lake
Angus Beef Burgers & Cheeseburgers All Beef Hot Dogs
Veggie Burgers
BBQ Chicken Quarters
Lettuce, Tomato, Onion, Pickles, Ketchup, Mustard
Classic & Gluten Free Buns
Dijon Potato Salad (gluten free) Vinegar Slaw (gluten free) Watermelon Wedges
Assorted Cookies & Brownies (to include gluten free) Local Sodas and Seltzer Waters

Showers

We will have a large shower truck provided by New England Mobile Showers with 16 shower stalls (8 men’s, 8 women’s) set up daily in each camp. Outside the showers will be sinks with mirrors and running hot water. 

Remember that you must bring your own towel(s) for the event. When you arrive at the showers, please leave your shoes outside the doors. And please be conscientious about the length of your shower – both to keep wait times short and to conserve energy and water.

Shower Operation Schedule
Aug. 19:       3-9 p.m.
Aug. 20:       5:30-8:30 a.m.
                     11 a.m. – 4 p.m. 
                     6-9 p.m.
Aug. 21:       5:30-8:30 a.m.
                     1-9 p.m.
Aug. 22:       5:30-8:30 a.m.
                     11 a.m. – 4 p.m. 
                     6-9 p.m.
Aug. 23:       5:30-8:30 a.m.
                     1-9 p.m.
Aug. 24:       5:30-8:30 a.m.
                     11 a.m. – 4 p.m. 
                     6-9 p.m.
Aug. 25:       5:30-7:30 a.m.
                     11:30-4 p.m.

Towels

You’re responsible for bringing your own towels – or you can arrange to have our tent-service vendor, Comfy Campers, provide you a fresh, laundered towel every day; they can also provide a chair.

Handwashing

We will have handwashing and hand-sanitizing stations positioned throughout camp and at all rest and lunch stops. It will be a mix of full handwash stations and smaller units with hand sanitizer. With a group this size traveling together for a week, it’s imperative that you use these stations regularly.

Toilets

There will be clean portable toilets by Stone Industries positioned in groups throughout camp and at all rest and lunch stops. The same units will be with us all week, with the vendor servicing and moving them each day.

Laundry

The communities of Schroon Lake and Saranac Lake each have laundromats, but nobody wants to do laundry while on vacation. If you can hold on cleaning your clothes until Wednesday, Aug. 23, the Saranac Lake High School After Prom Committee would happy to handle it for you. Simply drop off your dirty laundry at their table near Help Desk in camp between 4-6 p.m. and pick up your clean, and folded laundry between 7-9 a.m. on Thursday, August 24th. Laundry must fit into the bag provided at drop-off (must not be stuffed to overfull). The cost per bag/load is $20 and all proceeds will go to planning a safe and fun prom for the students.

Water

We will also have water stations positioned throughout camp (start/finish line, near the mechanics, etc.) each day. In addition, there will be at least one water station at every rest and lunch stop – or coolers filled with water if there is no water source at the stop. The custom-built, multi-spigot stations are perfect for filling water bottles.

Sustainability

As a conservation-minded organization, Cycle Adirondacks is committed to minimizing the environmental impact of this event. Our recycling and composting program helps to reduce our environmental footprint and is supported by sponsorship from Casella Resource Solutions and Common Grounds Gardens.

Waste Streams

Our efforts begin with working to separate waste into three streams: recycling, compost and garbage. We’ll have sorting receptacles throughout the event – in camp, especially at the dining area, plus at all rest stops and lunch. The receptacles will be labeled, one for each waste stream. We know that recycling and composting procedures vary geographically and following these guidelines helps more recyclable and compostable waste gets handled properly. So our volunteers will be stationed at some of the collection areas to help you get the hang of sorting effectively.

From the receptacles, we’ll send waste in different directions – to the nearest compost facility, to nearby recycling centers, and to local garbage-disposal resources.

Materials

Reduction is key to minimizing impact and that’s why you won’t see plastic water bottles, Styrofoam or other non-recyclable containers at our event. Another significant way we’re reducing landfill volume is by requiring all vendors to use compostable or recyclable materials in every possible situation.

Printing

We make a concerted effort to reduce our paper use on the event. Electronic documents such as this help to minimize the amount of paper products consumed.

Help Desk

The Help Desk is your go-to resource for answers and information. This tent will be positioned in a convenient place in camp each day, staffed by helpful event volunteers who can answer almost any question – or find the answer. Here is where you’ll find out where something is located in camp if you can’t seem to find it, check the Lost and Found, or just get help with whatever it is you’re seeking. We’ll also have a message board here where you can leave information for other riders.

The Help Desk will be open 7 to 9 a.m. in our morning camp, and from 1 to 6 p.m. in our evening camp.

Community Hospitality Booth

In each camp the host community will have a table or tent near the Help Desk with information on all the local activities, resources, history and pretty much anything you might want to know about that town. We encourage you to visit the Community Hospitality Booth in every town; it’s a great way to get a better feel for these great towns, as well as an efficient way to find a local resource you might be interested in – from where to wash clothes to museums and bars.

Mechanics

We’ll have a team of mechanics on hand, in camp and at lunch on the route each day. You’ll find them next to the bike corral in each camp, open from 6:30-9 a.m. in our morning camp and from 3-9 p.m. in our evening camp, ready to help you with your bike. You’ll only be charged for any parts needed to repair your bike; mechanic labor is provided by Cycle Adirondacks. Please tip your mechanics accordingly.

Bike Storage

When you arrive in camp you can leave your bike in our bike corral, featuring custom bike racks built by our friends at the Tupper Lake Tinman Triathlon, which will be located near the mechanic area at each site. There is no check-in or checkout procedure and the racks will be located in a secure location in camp each night.

Baggage

We will give you numbered tags for your baggage, and it will be transported for you every day by our volunteers. All you have to do is bring your one or two bags to the baggage trucks each morning – no later than 8:30 a.m. Helpful community volunteers are available to transport your bag from your tent to the truck; it’s suggested you tip them, since this service is a fundraiser for their organization. When your bag gets to the truck it will be loaded up and taken directly to the next site, where it will be unloaded onto the ground and sorted into numbered groups. You can pick up baggage in the evening camp as soon as it arrives; it should get there ahead of you unless you’re a really, really fast rider. Again, there will be local volunteers available to help you move your bags.

NOTE: We’re serious about the 65-pound limit; please be considerate of the people hauling your bag every day.

Even though you will have numbered baggage, it’s a good idea to put some kind of unique marking or adornment on your bag – a lot of them end up looking the same, much like black suitcases at the airport baggage carousel. Make yours easily identifiable: a piece of ribbon, a colorful bag tag, street-style graffiti… be creative.

Gear Drop

Because temperatures tend to be cool in the morning and warm in the afternoon, you may end up with some clothing or other gear that felt great when you started out but is a bit much as the day warms up. This is why we have Gear Drop. You’ll be able to shed clothes at the rest stops where we’ll collect and deliver it to the baggage drop area in camp for you later in the day.

Here’s how it works: You should bring a personal Gear Drop bag. It can be a mesh laundry bag, a stuff sack or a Zip-Loc bag,– it doesn’t matter other than that you should be able to fit it in your jersey or jacket pocket when you start out each day. This way you get to choose what kind of vessel you want to use, and it’ll be easier for you to pick out of the pile that afternoon. We’ll write your Rider Number on it, or attach a label, the first time you drop it, so we can sort out bags later for retrieval – please keep this number on it all week.

Gear Drop bags will be transported to camp, but only after every rider has been through the lunch stop – so the truck tends to show up in the late afternoon. The bags will be dropped in the same area as your larger baggage.

Cell Coverage

Cell service is mostly consistent throughout the route, however there will be spots without service. It should also be noted that Keene Valley only carries Verizon service.

Device Charging

First we’d like to note that a bike tour is an excellent place to un-plug for a while… but we also understand that you’ll want to charge your device. So we’re offering a free device-charging station next to the Help Desk in each camp. It’s pretty straightforward: plug in your device, come back in an hour, pick up a freshly charged device. Please be considerate and don’t leave your device too long – others need that spot after you.

NOTE: This area is not monitored by Cycle Adirondacks. It’s recommended you CLEARLY LABEL your devices to avoid any confusion or device mix ups.

Wi-Fi Access

Besides charging those devices, we know you’d like to use them as effectively as possible. The challenge to riding in the “wild” Adirondacks is that cell coverage and Wi-Fi access are elusive in many places. We will do what we can to facilitate access, but cannot promise it.

Event Retail

We will operate a robust retail tent near the Help Desk of each camp. It will include Cycle Adirondacks cycling apparel, lifestyle wear and various products from our event partners. Our bike-shop partner, Placid Planet, will also have products in this area. This is also the area where you will check out for any parts purchased from Placid Planet mechanics. This is a mobile enterprise, so selection will be limited, but they will have a variety of items available. They can take cash or credit.

First Aid

We will have our emergency personnel on the route and available for minor first aid in camp after the route has closed; they will have a tent in the vicinity of the Help Desk. The Help Desk will also have a first-aid kit available. If you have a medical emergency in camp, contact the Help Desk or any of our staff members.

Return to Table of Contents


On The Route

Course Hours

The route is open daily from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the exception of Day 6 when we’ll start a bit early, which will be announced during our evening program the day before.

This means there is no course support until 7 a.m. – please do not start riding sooner than this, because you will not be considered part of the event and will not be supported.

And you must finish by 5 p.m. each day; if you’re still on the route at 5 p.m. one of our SAG vehicles will offer you a ride to camp. If you refuse a ride into camp at 5 p.m., again you will not be considered part of the event and will not be supported.

Daily Route Descriptions and Map Links

There is no substitute for riding the roads we take our guests on and we spend a lot of time riding in the Adirondacks…what can we say, it’s part of the job! Once we’ve selected the absolute best routes, we build our maps and cue sheets using the latest technology, giving us the opportunity to provide digital route guides, interactive mapping and downloadable files that allow navigation on your favorite on-bike device. This is, of course, a supplement to the route marking, printed cue sheets and support crews that join the tour. They’re not required, but you can download any or all the daily ride routes HERE.

Sunday, August 20, 2017
Day 1: Stretch those legs!
Start/End: Schroon Lake / Schroon Lake
Distance: 35.8 or 63.3 mi
Total Gain: +2,149’ / -2,149’ or +3,582’ / -3,582’

It’s time to break the ice and get to know your Cycle Adirondacks friends, new and old. Going into our 3rd year we’ve begun to develop our own little community and it will be so nice to see everyone again. And for newcomers, welcome! Our 2017 route starts off just as you’ve come to expect…heading straight into the heart of the Park. We’ll get warm climbing some back roads in the first five miles. The reward will be views of classic Adirondack landscapes from the top of the ridge. From there it’s 15 miles of rural roads that gradually roll downward to the first rest stop at North Creek, home of Gore Mountain as well as some of the largest garnet deposits in the world. From North Creek you’ll turn east and make your way toward Brant Lake for a visit with our good friend Drew at The Hub Café and bike shop. Drew’s quiet little slice of bike heaven was such a popular stop in 2016 that we just couldn’t resist going back. Although this isn’t an official rest stop (you’ll get another at mile 40) it sure does make a nice place to take a little break. After leaving The Hub, we’ll ride along the north shore of Brant Lake and the east shore of Schroon Lake before returning to camp for a hearty lunch. We’ll spend time in this truly authentic piece of the Adirondacks throughout the week. Day 1 gives you a nice taste of what it means to be inside the Blue Line.

Monday, August 21, 2017
Day 2: On the move!
Start/End: Schroon Lake / Keene Valley
Distance: 61.2 mi
Elevation Gain/Descent: +4,015’ / -3,855’

Today we move…straight into the majestic High Peaks Wilderness with its expansive mountain views, pristine waterways and endless outdoor recreation opportunities. We’ll ride straight into this rugged mountain country, but first we’ll head east to the exquisite Lake Champlain Valley and lakeshore. We start the day off riding through rolling countryside, climbing from 850’ to 1,250’ in the first 25 miles. The start of our 1,000’ descent to the lakeshore offers spectacular views of Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains of Vermont to the east. As we travel north along Lake Champlain, we revisit a 10 mile stretch of the 2016 route but then head into Elizabethtown for our grand entrance to the High Peaks Region. Our route offers views of some of the most famous of the 46 High Peaks, including Giant, Dix, Algonquin and Marcy, New York’s tallest peak. Notice the route offers VIEWS of the High Peaks…we’ll have a steady but manageable ascent of 1,200’ for eight of the last twelve miles on Day 2. So settle in, enjoy the wide paved shoulder and breathtaking vistas. Keene Valley awaits your arrival and we’re so glad to be here!

Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Day 3: Welcome to the High Peaks!
Start/End: Keene Valley / Keene Valley
Distance: 36.3 or 51.1 mi
Elevation Gain/Descent: +2,247’ / -2,247‘ or +3,217’ / -3,217’

There’s something about waking up in the mountains that’s just…well, you’ll see. Keene Valley, Au Sable Forks and Elizabethtown are three quintessential Adirondack communities, each with its own character and charm. There are many jumping-off points for access to wilderness areas in the Adirondacks, but Keene Valley is clearly the king, being within a stone’s throw from the Great Range and New York’s tallest alpine peaks. Au Sable Forks is just about at the mid-point for today’s ride and a great place to take a break, enjoy the quiet, small-town feel and maybe take a dip in the river (who knows, you may even see our Sign Team volunteers if you do…they have been known to take swimming breaks).

The East and West Branches of the Ausable River meet in Au Sable Forks, making it an attractive stop for anglers. The Ausable is renowned for its brown trout and rainbows are also present. Elizabethtown is the seat of government in Essex County. It also happens to be perfectly located to provide spectacular mountain vistas and a nice welcome back into the mountains on your return today. Although today’s route will allow you to rack up a good amount of ascent, the riding mostly traverses short, manageable climbs and rolling hills. There are two considerable inclines on the long route and one on the short route. Either way, you’ll be treated to a nice descent back into Keene Valley to cool those legs and get ready to party…or relax…or whatever you choose. For those of you who love to chew up some vertical, today will be the day we offer the optional Whiteface Hill Climb. The Veteran’s Memorial Highway is a grueling, constant climb to the top of Whiteface Mountain. It’s not for the weary, it’s steep and winding, but the pavement is brand new, traffic is usually light and the views are simply stunning. We’ll have shuttle service again. But for those of you who want to score huge bonus points (and a beer on the house), the ride from Keene Valley to Whiteface and back is pretty manageable. This is the heart of the Adirondack High Peaks Wilderness, enjoy!

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Day 4: The Adirondacks’ Coolest Place!
Start/End: Keene Valley / Saranac Lake
Distance: 58.1mi Elevation Gain/Descent: +3,568’ / -3,028’

After two wonderful days in Keene Valley we’re on the move again, eventually arriving in the hometown of Cycle Adirondacks and the WCS Adirondack Program. But first we’ve got some riding to do. This is our backyard and if you haven’t ridden with us before, today you’ll learn why we say that this is truly the finest place on Earth! As we ride out of Keene Valley in the morning, the Sentinel Range will be to the west, providing views towards Pitchoff Mountain, Notch Mountain and the Barkeater Cliffs, all popular ice and rock climbing destinations. You’ll also catch views of several of the “lower” Adirondack peaks that top out just below the 4,000’ elevation required to be called a “High Peak”. Nonetheless, the views in the first half of today’s ride are amazing and the riding is quiet and peaceful with good pavement and a smooth shoulder. At nearly the 15 mile mark, we turn west and start our approach to Saranac Lake. The road gets smaller and quieter as you head towards Wilmington, home of Whiteface, the alpine ski venue in the 1932 and 1980 Olympic Winter Games. Our path to Saranac Lake will take us around the back side of Whiteface (a.k.a. “to Saranac Lake, the good way”) into familiar territory for our 2016 guests. Remember that beautiful little water stop on Franklin Falls Reservoir? We do too. We can’t guarantee another Bald Eagle sighting but we can tell you that we’re excited to ride these locally popular roads again. Welcome to our home, we’re so glad you’re here!

Thursday, August 24, 2017
Day 5: Discover the magic and history of the Winter Olympics!
Start/End: Saranac Lake / Saranac Lake
Distance: 24.3 mi or 40.3 mi
Daily Gain/Descent: +1,397’ / -1,397’ or +2,209’ / -2,209’

Day 5 is all about options…on the bike and off the bike, passive and active. We have two relatively short rides planned for today, one to visit the Wild Center in Tupper Lake and the other to enjoy Lake Placid, New York’s Olympic Village. We are in the mountains now so whichever ride you choose you will encounter some terrain change. But the distances are shorter so the overall amount of ascent is less and the Lake Placid route is the flatter of the two. Of course, if you’re a real animal you could always ride them both and make this a solid 65-mile day (just sayin’). But if you’re like most of the rest of us, today will be a day for relaxation and exploration. There is so much to see and do here that we’ll save the details for when you arrive. But regardless of your interests, it can all be found in the Tri-Lakes Region. This is a truly unique and authentic place…today is the day to take it all in!

Friday, August 25, 2017
Day 6: Saving some of the best riding for last!
Start/End: Saranac Lake / Schroon Lake
Distance: 57.9 mi
Daily Gain/Descent: +3,192’ / -3,918’

Some tours treat the final day as just a way to get “back to the start”…not Cycle Adirondacks. We’ve saved some of the best riding for last because we want your final day on the bike to be as memorable and enjoyable as the others. As we ride back through Lake Placid you’ll get a chance to see (and visit if you choose) some of the Olympic venues where history has been made. If you haven’t seen the Nordic ski jumps in person you will leave this year’s tour with a new-found respect for those men and women who hurl themselves through the air. The ride from Lake Placid into the Town of Keene affords some of the most stunning views of the Great Range, which provide a backdrop to pristine alpine lakes and rivers. This is what makes this area so popular for bicyclists, rock climbers and hikers. The terrain is also what makes this 10-mile stretch of road an area to use a little extra caution. The views are intriguing and not to be missed. It’s good to take advantage of the trailhead parking areas and designated scenic overlooks to capture your memories. And remember that our friends Evan and Hilary from Pure Adirondacks will be with us along the way in case you miss one. Once we pass the 20-mile mark, the climbing is mostly over. There is one short hill outside of Keene Valley but that’s pretty much it. And then the last 25 miles is nearly all downhill (why not end the week that way? You’ve earned it!). What a week this has been. Thanks for riding with us, we hope to see you again in 2018!

Ride Rules

We have a few rules in place for Cycle Adirondacks participants that are necessary in order for us all to have a safe and successful bike tour. Please read these rules and abide by them – and yes, they all apply to you, personally.

  1. You must wear an ANSI- or SNELL-approved helmet at all times when you’re riding your bike on the route, and you’re required to have at least two bike-specific water bottles (or an equivalent capacity) with you on the route. No screw-top water bottles are allowed on the route (they fall out or get dropped, creating litter and hazards for other riders).
  2. Ride safely. This means you must obey traffic laws – riders must obey the same laws as motor vehicle drivers. You must also obey any instructions you’re given during the tour by a law enforcement officer or route monitor. Beyond specific laws, here are other rules: stay to the right side of the road, as far as is safely possible. Never cross the center line for ANY reason. Ride single-file unless there is no vehicle traffic, and then ride no more than two wide. Ride in pacelines only if you’re experienced with them, and no paceline should contain more than six riders. If you’re deemed to be an unsafe rider you will be removed from the event with no refund.
  3. Only self-propelled or pedal-assist bicycles are allowed; no full-electric or otherwise motorized vehicles are allowed.
  4. All participants must sign an Event Waiver. By signing it you agree to all its terms, and only then will you be given a numbered wristband. This wristband is your event ID and must be worn throughout the event. Only people with wristbands will be allowed access to event amenities such as meals.
  5. The route is only open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Course support is offered only during those hours. You will not be covered by our insurance or any safety systems if you (a) start before 7:00 a.m.; (b) ride off the official mapped and signed route; or (c) are not to the next camp by 7:00 p.m. and don’t accept a ride in a SAG vehicle.
  6. Riders, their families, friends or others are not allowed to bring a personal vehicle on the route (with the exception of registered Non-Cycling Companions).
Signage/Hazards

Our routes will be well-marked. We’ll use colored markings on the roadway to indicate direction and turns, as well as other things you should pay attention to. Bright spray chalk will indicate a road hazard such as a pothole, railroad tracks, etc. We also place signs at specific distance intervals, key intersections, tricky turns, and points of interest along the way. Although we make every effort to mark hazards, please remember that you are responsible for riding safely and following the rules of the road.

Route Monitors

We’ll have an enthusiastic team of Route Monitors along the route who will position themselves at busy or tricky intersections or other key points. Please heed their instructions – they’re out there for everyone’s safety. For example, our monitors do not have the ability to stop traffic if you’re making a left turn, so wait until they tell you it’s safe to go.

Support and Gear (SAG) Vehicles

We will have three fully equipped SAG (Support and Gear) vehicles along the route each day. These vehicles have a volunteer driver who is in communication with our staff and other resources throughout the route. They’re also stocked up with minor repair supplies, some food and drink to get you through to the next rest stop if you’re bonking, first-aid kits and a fairly amazing array of little things you didn’t realize you might need.

The point is, if you need help on the road, look for a SAG and give the driver the “thumbs-down” signal if you need help. If you do, the SAG will stop to help. If you have a mechanical problem or absolutely can’t continue on your bike, they’ll give you a ride to the next rest stop or end of the day’s route for rest and repair.

A couple important points to make: First, the SAG vans are not taxis. It’s expected that you will show up in shape to ride this event’s route, not just pedal until you get tired and then flag down a ride to camp. Second, once you get in a SAG, you’ll be on the van’s schedule, not yours. These are busy vehicles, and they don’t just shuttle you straight to the next camp – they’ll likely have multiple stops on the way.

Emergency/Medical

We will have emergency medical responders on the route each day. These responders are ready to address any kind of injury or accident, and have made arrangements with local medical facilities and providers in case we need to transport an injured or sick rider.

If you are involved in or witness an accident that requires immediate medical attention, flag down the nearest SAG van, course monitor or staff vehicle and let them know help is needed. They will use our communications network to get a responder there as soon as possible. Unless you’re a trained medical professional, do NOT move or treat a badly injured rider; your job is to keep yourself and others safe.

If you need medical attention, services from the event vehicles are free of charge. If you need to be transported and/or handed off to a local medical facility or Life Flight service, your own insurance coverage takes over and/or you’re responsible for any charges.

Communications/Text Alerts

Just for your information: Cycle Adirondacks is connected every day by a complex web of communication. We thoroughly monitor the route where there isn’t cellphone coverage; use cellphones for where there is, and use dozens of handheld radios for our volunteers and staff to communicate within camp and the community. Our text alert service is the best way to receive timely updates such as weather alerts, route changes, impromptu dance contests, etc. You can sign up by texting @adk2017 to 81010 (if prompted, reply “S” and/or provide your name to be added).

Rider Safety

This brings up an important subject: rider safety. We have a few expectations you should be aware of.

First is that we will be traveling a significant portion of the time on state highways, which have speed limits of 55 mph but some vehicles driving significantly faster than that. The roads are built to accommodate this traffic, but it magnifies the need for safe and alert riding, even on back roads.

So… please ride single-file on narrow roads. We know it’s tempting to ride side-by-side to chat, but this is for your safety. There are a number of nice back roads on our route where you can double up here and there as long as you’re still highly aware of traffic, so save it for then.

Pacelines are efficient and fun – but they can cause problems on group events. If you do paceline, you must be safe and courteous. That means not cutting back suddenly in front of slower riders, and not passing when there’s vehicle traffic coming from behind – even if you have to slow down your paceline, DO NOT swing out to pass slower riders if there is traffic approaching from behind. The majority of our riders aren’t interested in how fast they can ride, so you need to be considerate of them. Pacelines are limited to 6 riders or fewer.

Lunch and Rest Stops

We want to make sure you’re never very far from food and drink – and that what we offer is tasty and nutritious. With that in mind, here’s how we have the route set up. There are two rest stops daily spaced approximately 20 miles apart.

A rest stop includes a variety of food choices – proteins, carbs, salty/sweet, fruit, etc. – plus water and energy drink. And the lunch stop each day features a full meal – although it is much lighter than breakfast and lunch, it still has a substantial amount of calories. Besides water and sports drink, sodas will be available here. All stops have toilets, and the lunch stop will have a mechanic on duty.

Mechanics

As mentioned earlier, we’ll have mechanics on duty in camp, but also on the route. One mechanic will be stationed at lunch; rest stops won’t have mechanics. If you have a mechanical problem on the route, flag down a SAG vehicle with a “thumbs-down” and you can catch a ride to lunch or the next camp (on the SAG driver’s schedule). As in camp, the lunch mechanic will have his full set of tools and some common supplies with him. If you need specific parts, he will help you decide if you can finish the route or not that day, and then work with you to get the parts and the repair done. You are responsible for paying for parts but not labor – mechanics gratefully accept tips.

Return to Table of Contents


Fun Stuff

Entertainment
The entertainment area serves as the camp communications center for getting information to all riders, as well as where we feature live local entertainment in every community.

2017 Entertainment Schedule

Schroon Lake – Woods Lodge Lawn
Sat. Aug. 19
3-9 p.m. – Good Nature Beer Garden Open
7-9 p.m. – Willie Playmore Band 

Sun. Aug. 20
3-9 p.m. – Good Nature Beer Garden Open
7 p.m. – Stephen Gratto & Sons – Comedy and Variety
7:30-9 p.m. – Howl on Wheels Story Slam

Keene Valley – Keene Valley Country Club
Mon. Aug. 21
3-9 p.m. – Good Nature Beer Garden Open
7-9 p.m. – Lostdog featuring Live Art by Kaz

Tues. Aug. 22
3-9 p.m. – Good Nature Beer Garden Open
7 p.m. – Adirondack Wildlife Refuge live animal experience
7:30-9 p.m. – Howl on Wheels Story Slam 

Saranac Lake – Riverside Park
Wed. Aug. 23
3-9 p.m. – Good Nature Beer Garden Open
5:30 p.m. – Bitters & Bones Farm-to-Table Taco Bar Opens
7-9 p.m. – Music on the Green presents Alex Torres & His Latin Orchestra 

Thurs. Aug. 24
3-7 p.m. – Good Nature Beer Garden Open
5-7 p.m. – Saranac Lake ArtWorks Downtown Galleries Open 
7-9 p.m. – Party on the Patio at The Waterhole featuring The Medicinals

Beer Garden

Toasting a ride with a cold beverage is a proud and honored tradition in cycling – and you’ll have plenty of opportunity to do just that on Cycle ADK. Our Beer Garden will be open from 3-9 p.m. with a variety of beverages offered by Good Nature Brewing, New York state’s first certified Farm Brewery. Also featured will be a selection of wines from the Heron Hill Winery of the Finger Lakes region.

And at the end of the week, our friends from Good Nature Farm Brewery will provide each guest with a FREE six pack to take home.

One serious note: Please be respectful of alcohol laws. In all sites there will be restrictions on where you can be with alcohol in your possession. Please remember that physical exertion can affect your body’s reaction to alcohol – besides making for a bad ride the next day, drinking too much is embarrassing, and we are guests in these communities. Enough said.

Off-Bike Activities

Just when you think there couldn’t possibly be any more, there is. Cycle Adirondacks’ new and unique format allows guests Just when you think there couldn’t possibly be any more, there is. Cycle Adirondacks unique format allows guests to customize their cycling vacation like never before. Since the tour will spend two days in each of our overnight host communities, you have more time to explore. Whether you choose to ride the short or long route on our layover day or choose not to ride at all, we’ve got plenty for you to do.

Check out this incredible list of amazing off-bike activities, but please note that some activities are available to a limited number of people and require pre-registration. 

Schroon Lake – August 20

Bike-to-hike: Mt. Severence
This popular 2.4 mile roundtrip is a moderate hike and offers a narrow, but highly scenic view of Schroon Lake and the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness. This trip will be guided by WCS staff.
Departure: 2 p.m. by bike from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Distance from Camp: 1.7 miles to trailhead
Pre-Registration Required: THIS PROGRAM IS FULL

Hoppy Trails Brew Bus
This three hour bus tour includes stops at Paradox Brewery & Adirondack Brewery before returning to the Good Nature Farm Brewery beer garden for a special tasting. A $45 fee per person collected at the bus includes a tour at each location, samples & snacks along the route.
Departure: 2 p.m. by bus from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Capacity: 14 (Age 21 and over)
Cost: $45/person
Pre-Registration Required: Yes

Boat Rental
If you have some time to get out on the water on the front or back end of Cycle Adirondacks, Schroon Lake Marina is the place. Pontoons, ski boats, canoes, kayaks and stand up paddle boards, they’ve got ’em.
Distance from Camp: .7 miles
Capacity: Varies by rental
Cost: Varies by rental
Pre-Registration Required: Call ahead

Swimming
The Schroon Lake public beach is just a short walk from Cycle Adirondacks Camp. Jump in, the water’s fine.
Distance from Camp: .3 miles
Pre-Registration Required: No

Keene Valley – August 22

Guided Hike: Roostercomb
Views from the summit ledge and Valley View Ledge complete a 360 degree panorama of Mt. Marcy and the Johns Brook Valley plus Giant Mt. and the Ausable Valley. This is a strenuous five mile round trip hike. Adequate footwear and hiking experience is necessary. Hike will be guided by WCS and Nature Conservancy staff.
Departure: 2 p.m. walk from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Distance from Camp: Trailhead starts at camp
Pre-Registration Required: THIS PROGRAM IS FULL

Whiteface Mountain: Veteran’s Memorial Highway Hill Climb
OK, so this one is an on-bike activity, but it’s well worth the work. Pedal 11 miles over an 8 percent grade up Whiteface Mountain’s scenic Veteran’s Memorial Highway. Whiteface Mountain is New York’s fifth highest peak with 360 degree panoramic views of the Adirondacks, New England, and Montreal. View the route at https://ridewithgps.com/routes/23244485.
Departure: 8:30 a.m. by bus from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Capacity: 22 
Cost: $15/person
Pre-Registration Required: Yes

Bike-To-Swim
Local, casual, guided ride to multiple swimming spots in the Ausable River watershed.
Departure: 2 p.m. walk from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Distance from Camp:
Capacity: 10
Pre-Registration Required: Yes

Swimming
Just a short walk from Cycle Adirondacks Camp is the pristine Ausable River.
Distance from Camp: .4 miles
Pre-Registration Required: No

Saranac Lake – August 24

Museum & Brewery Bus tour
Start your day at The Wild Center and finish it with a tour of Big Tupper Brewing & Raquette River Brewing in Tupper Lake. A $15 per person fee will give you access to The Wild Center. Beer tastings will also have a small fee. Bus will return to camp in mid afternoon.
Departure: 9:30 a.m. from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Capacity: 18
Pre-Registration Required: Yes

Guided Canoe/Kayak Experience
Join Paul Smith’s College VIC Naturalists and WCS for a guided paddle on Barnum Pond via Barnum Brook. This two-hour program starts with a brief walk to the dock and includes at least one hour on the water. This is a great activity for both novice and experienced paddlers. The boat, life vest, and paddle are all provided.
Departure: 2 p.m. by van from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Pre-Registration Required: THIS PROGRAM IS FULL

Historic Saranac Lake Laboratory Museum
The Saranac Laboratory Museum is open 10-4 and features a new Roaring Twenties exhibit. The John Black Room exhibit explores the decade through the context of a grand hotel of the era and celebrates the upcoming reopening of the restored Hotel Saranac.  Admission is $5, members and children are free of charge. Visitors typically spend 30 minutes to one hour exploring the museum. Exhibits are self-guided, however staff is always on hand to help guide visitors through the exhibits and answer any questions.
Distance from Camp: .5 miles 
Pre-Registration Required: 
No

Hike A Saranac Lake 6er
At 1.8 miles round trip, Baker Mountain also referred to as Mount Baker, depending on who you ask, is one of the most popular family hikes in the region. Starting from the north end of Moody Pond you will start climbing almost immediately. The trail is a bit steep but offers great views as you ascend further. At 0.6 miles from the trailhead, an intersection offers part of an upper mountain loop. Left is a less aggressive climb and avoids the steep ledges that can be found if you head right. Both finish at the summit of Baker. The loop makes for a great hike option. The summit offers great views over the Village of Saranac Lake, the McKenzie Mountain Wilderness Area and toward the High Peaks Region. Be sure you are on the marked trail when you leave.
Distance from Camp: 1.6 miles to trailhead
Pre-Registration Required: No

Ride The Adirondack Carousel
In 1999-2000, local Saranac Lake wood carver Karen Loffler, while working on a master’s degree in creative studies, came across an article in a woodcarving magazine that showed a small children’s carousel fitted with woodland animals. The combination of a creative approach to problem solving, her love of woodcarving, and a desire to foster imagination and strengthen her local community, inspired Karen’s dream. The result: the Adirondack Carousel is now complete in Saranac Lake with hand-carved figures of animals indigenous to the Adirondacks.
Distance from Camp: .5 miles 
Pre-Registration Required: 
No

Activities Pre-Registration

 

WCS Cycle Adirondacks Science Program Schedule

SCHROON LAKE – AUGUST 20
BIKE-TO-HIKE: MT. SEVERENCE

This popular 2.4 mile roundtrip is a moderate hike and offers a narrow, but highly scenic view of Schroon Lake and the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness. This trip will be guided by WCS staff.
Departure: 2 p.m. by bike from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Distance from Camp: 1.7 miles to trailhead
Pre-Registration Required: THIS PROGRAM IS FULL

ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

People, place, and economy of the Adirondacks. Why do rural places matter?
Join WCS volunteers for a presentation on the people, place, and economy of the Adirondacks! Find out why rural places matter and the challenges the people here face. Participants will receive a  brief overview of the subject, followed by a discussion where you’re encouraged to ask plenty of questions. Come learn about the amazing people that make the Adirondacks what they are!
Where: The round-table tent in camp.
When: 4:45pm – 5:30pm 

CONSERVATION CANINES DEMONSTRATION

Some of the most pressing conservation issues need to distinguish between multiple, concurrent pressures facing wildlife over a large geographic range. The Conservation Canines program addresses this need by combining the precision and efficiency of detection dogs to readily locate wildlife scat (feces) samples with the ability to extract a wide variety of genetic, physiological, toxicological and dietary indicators from these samples. These indicators enable us to ascertain species abundance, distribution, resource use, and physiological health all in relation to the environmental pressure(s) the species is encountering.
Where: Near round-table tent in camp
When: 5:30pm


KEENE VALLEY – AUGUST 21
SOLAR ECLIPSE VIEWING

That’s right; this year’s tour coincides with a fantastic natural spectacle! Come to the WCS camp tent between 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. to see and learn about the eclipse. 
Where: Cycle Adirondacks Camp
When: Max eclipse at 2:40 p.m.

ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

Changes in the park’s animal fauna over the last century
Join WCS volunteers for a presentation on changes in the park’s animal fauna over the last century. Participants will receive a  brief overview of the subject, followed by a discussion where you’re encouraged to ask plenty of questions. Come learn about the fascinating creatures that inhabit the mountains and how they cope with change!
Where: The round-table tent in camp.
When: 4:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

August 22

GUIDED HIKE: ROOSTERCOMB

Views from the summit ledge and Valley View Ledge complete a 360 degree panorama of Mt. Marcy and the Johns Brook Valley plus Giant Mt. and the Ausable Valley. This is a strenuous five mile round trip hike. Adequate footwear and hiking experience is necessary. Hike will be guided by WCS and Nature Conservancy staff.
Departure: 2 p.m. walk from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Distance from Camp: Trailhead starts at camp
Pre-Registration Required: THIS PROGRAM IS FULL

ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

Nature & human nature: our relationships and interactions. 
Join WCS volunteers for a presentation on nature & human nature. Participants will receive a  brief overview of the subject, followed by a discussion where you’re encouraged to ask plenty of questions. Come learn about our relationships and interactions with nature, how they’ve changed over time, and our struggle to find sustainability.
Where: Cycle Adirondacks Camp
When: 4:45pm – 5:30pm


SARANAC LAKE – AUGUST 23
ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

Exurban development and land use issues
Join WCS volunteers for a presentation on exurban development and land use issues. 
Participants will receive a  brief overview of the subject, followed by a discussion where you’re encouraged to ask plenty of questions. Come learn about the struggle to keep the Adirondacks “forever wild” while also providing its communities opportunity to grow.
Where: The round-table tent in camp.
When: 4:45pm – 5:30pm

AUGUST 24
BOG WALK

Experience a guided tour of Bloomingdale Bog, located just outside Saranac Lake. There is very little elevation change on this hike, making it ideal for the entire family. Bloomingdale Bog is one of the largest bogs in the Adirondacks and it’s home to many species of wild birds like the very social gray jays who often steal food right out of your hand! The hike will be approximately 2 miles round trip. Sunblock and adequate shoes are required. 
Departure: 9:00am shuttle from Cycle Adirondacks Camp.
Distance from camp: 3.2 miles
Capacity: 12 people

GUIDED CANOE EXPERIENCE

Join Paul Smith’s College VIC Naturalists and WCS for a guided paddle on Barnum Pond via Barnum Brook. This two-hour program starts with a brief walk to the dock and includes at least one hour on the water. This is a great activity for both novice and experienced paddlers. The boat, life vest, and paddle are all provided.
Departure: 2 p.m. by van from Cycle Adirondacks Camp
Distance from camp: 13.5 miles
Pre-Registration Required: THIS PROGRAM IS FULL

ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

Boreal wildlife issues and impacts of climate change 
Join WCS volunteers for a presentation on boreal wildlife issues and impacts of climate change. Participants will receive a  brief overview of the subject, followed by a discussion where you’re encouraged to ask plenty of questions. Come learn why the Adirondacks are the southern limit of boreal species, and the reason they’re so threatened by climate change.
Where: The round-table tent in camp.
When: 4:45pm – 5:30pm

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Event Retail

It’s likely you’ll want a few mementos of your Cycle ADK experience, so we will have an Event Retail tent in camp each day, typically adjacent to the Help Desk and/or Community Tent. Event Retail will be open every day from 3 p.m. until it gets too dark or too slow to stay open. We’ll have a small variety of quality items available, including jerseys and bike shorts, T-shirts and hoodies, caps, Cycle ADK socks, insulated water bottles and more. The retail tent will also feature products from event partners like Placid Planet, Pure Adirondacks, DAK Bar and others. Our Event Retail tent will be set up to accept cash or credit cards.

Social Media

We’re quite fortunate to have Evan Williams and Nick LaScala of Pure ADK as our full-time social media/photography/video team during the ride. Be sure to follow our channels, and tell everyone you know to follow as well. It will be the best digital ride going.

Facebook.com/cycleadk
Twitter.com/cycleadk
Instagram.com/cycleadk

Official Event Hashtag: #CycleADK.

Wellness Services

In each camp we’ll have an area designated on the map as Wellness Services; it’ll typically be placed in as quiet an area as we can find. There will be several services available here.

Massage
If you think beer goes well with riding, well, we think massage goes even better. You’re working hard out there every day, so your body can definitely use a little love – and we have just the thing for you. Megan Parker of River Stone Wellness has put together a team of highly skilled licensed massage therapists for our event, and you’re going to want to take advantage of their services.

There are three elements to the massage service:

  • The LMTs will offer free short massages from 3-4 p.m. each day, Sunday through Friday, on a walk-up basis. Come by and get something worked on for a bit, or just a few minutes of peaceful bliss – and get to know our LMTs. (Based on the number of riders this year, you should plan to take advantage of this only once during the week)
  • LMTs will offer 30-minute and 60-minute massage appointments from 4-9 p.m. (morning appointments may be available as well; check with Megan by phone). Half-hour appointments will be $45; a one-hour appointment will be $80. This is the best way to recover from a day’s ride and be ready for the next one (well, sleep is important, too, but…)
  • There will be a self-service station as part of the Wellness Services area, which will have foam rollers and other therapeutic equipment available for riders to work out the kinks a bit on their own.

It’s best to make appointments ahead of time; just call Megan at 802-309-5447 to reserve your spot or ask any questions. Walk-up appointments will be on an availability basis, and you can sign up for a future appointment during the event as well.

If you have an appointment, check in at least 10 minutes early; you’ll be given an intake form/waiver to sign. You’ll be able to undress to the level you’re comfortable with, under or behind a sheet. The therapists are all licensed professionals.

Yoga

We’re lucky enough to offer you free yoga classes, led by Jennifer Holmes, who has been a student of yoga for 16 years and a teacher for six. Jennifer is a certified yoga teacher, Spinning instructor, and League Cycling Instructor (LCI) specializing in Vinyasa yoga and engaging students in cross-training activities designed to increase flexibility and improve core strength. An active outdoor enthusiast who enjoys long road rides, mountain biking, kayaking and cross-country skiing, she teaches a weekly Yoga for Athletes class in Albany.

Jennifer is thrilled to be returning to the Cycle Adirondacks tour. Each day, participants will have the opportunity to enjoy a morning wake-up class and/or post-ride stretch at camp as an additional benefit to weary riders looking to stretch their hamstrings, glutes, low back and other targeted muscle groups to help recover and rejuvenate in the designated Wellness Area.

Jennifer will lead two sessions per day in a grassy area in camp. You’re encouraged to bring a towel or yoga mat with you, as long as you can fit them in your bag(s) within the weight limit of 65 pounds.

Morning Sessions – 6:30-7 a.m.: Wake Up and FLOW Gentle Yoga
Gentle yoga classes are calm, fluid, and soothing, suitable for beginners and seasoned practitioners alike. Experience slow movements to warm the body and release muscular tension, breathing techniques to calm the nervous system, and simple postures to build stability.

Afternoon Sessions – 4-5 p.m.: Wind Down and Release
Afternoon yoga classes are multi-level and will explore the balance between effort and ease. Strengthen the body by sustaining more challenging postures at a moderate pace with poses designed to increase your balance, range of motion, and flexibility, especially in the hips and hamstrings. Explore how cycling and yoga complement each other to develop mind-body strength and stability. Release tension in your neck, shoulders and spine with a series of gentle twists and rejuvenate tired muscles. Modifications will be offered as needed.

Camp Games

We were looking around at all the green space we have in some of our camps, and we thought, “We should bring along some sports equipment, in case people want to play in the afternoon or evening!” So we’ll have some sports equipment available to check out from the Help Desk in each camp.


WHEW!!! 

You did it. This is quite a read – 12,103 words to be exact. But we hope this guide helps answer any questions you might have. However, if you have more, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We love speaking directly to our riders. 

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